Contribute

Contribute

Eventually, each text included in the Archive will be preceded by a peer-reviewed headnote of 75-100 words that will provide some sense of the theme, style and/or significance of that text and note any unusual features, in order to help a curious reader decide whether or not to read that particular text. Each of the Featured Items on the About page currently has a headnote. Together, they give a sense of the “headnote” genre. Please email the director about texts you might be interested in writing headnotes for. When you’ve drafted a headnote, please email a Word Doc of the headnote without any author identification to the director. There is no particular deadline. Groups of headnotes will be sent out for peer review every few months and you may be asked to revise in response to these reviews.

Download Contributor Package

Below is a list of texts that have not yet been transcribed. Select the text(s) that you would like to transcribe below and click the “Download” button to download an encoding package for that text, which will include:
  • The facsimile of the document
  • The TEI XML files
  • The RelaxNG schema
  • A custom oXygen project
To transcribe a text, you must have the software tool oXygen installed on your computer. UBC and other libraries have a license for this tool. Once you have installed oXygen and downloaded the appropriate encoding package, unzip the package file somewhere on your computer (i.e. in your Documents folder) and then open the wea_encoder.xpr file. On some systems, this might be as simple as double-clicking the file, which should open and load it within oXygen automatically; if that does not work, then open oXygen, and then click “Open New Project” and open the wea_encoder.xpr file.

Texts

Technical Feedback

If you have noticed a bug, typo, or errors on the site or if you have any other feedback, please contact us.

People Mentioned

Mary Chapman

Mary Chapman is the Director of The Winnifred Eaton Archive, a Professor of English, and Academic Director of the Public Humanities Hub at University of British Columbia. She is the author of the award-winning monograph Making Noise, Making News: Suffrage Print Culture and US Modernism (Oxford UP) and of numerous articles about American literature and women writers. She has also edited Becoming Sui Sin Far: Early Fiction, Journalism and Travel Writing by Edith Maude Eaton (McGill-Queen’s UP) and published essays on the Eaton sisters in American Quarterly, MELUS, Legacy, Canadian Literature, and American Periodicals. Her current research project is a microhistory of the Eaton family. For more information, see http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/mchapman/.

Joey Takeda

Joey Takeda is the Technical Director of The Winnifred Eaton Archive and a Developer at Simon Fraser University’s Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL). He is a graduate of the M.A. program in English at the University of British Columbia where he specialized in Indigenous and diasporic literature, science and technology studies, and the digital humanities.